Lumia 1020 vs iPhone 5 vs Galaxy S4: Quick camera shoot-out

Lumia1020-Trees
Nokia’s big claim for the very big Lumia 1020 is that its camera puts the competition to shame. So I’ve decided to test that out.
Each shot was taken at full auto with flash disabled, and the only change I’ve made otherwise is to shrink them down in the same way in Photoshop.
First of all, a night scene. Here’s the Lumia 1020:
Lumia1020-Night
The same shot, taken with an iPhone 5
iPhone5_Night
And then the same shot… sort of… with a Galaxy S4
GS4-Night
How about the sky at night (with trees)? Here’s the Lumia 1020
Lumia1020-Trees
And the iPhone 5
iPhone5-Trees
And then the Galaxy S4
GS4-Trees
For low light work, it’s pretty clear which smartphone camera is leading the pack, although obviously with apps and some semi-manual settings you could modify the end results somewhat. Again; I’m just working in auto, because a lot of smartphone shots are spur of the moment matters.
Heading into actual light, the classic of art classes, still bowl of fruit (with reflections). Here’s it’s a little closer. Here’s the Lumia 1020
Lumia1020-Bananas
The iPhone 5
iPhone5-Banana
And the Galaxy S4
GS4-Banana
Here things are closer than they might seem; the Nokia shot is nice and vibrant, but it’s got a slight colour cast to it that the other two smartphone cameras avoid.

Author: Alex

Alex Kidman is a multi-award winning Australian technology writer, former editor at Gizmodo, CNET, GameSpot, ZDNet, PC Mag, APC, Finder and as a contributor to the ABC, SMH, AFR, Courier Mail, GadgetGuy, PC & Tech Authority, Atomic and many more. He's been writing professionally since 1998, and his passions include technology, social issues, education, retro gaming and professional wrestling.

1 thought on “Lumia 1020 vs iPhone 5 vs Galaxy S4: Quick camera shoot-out

  1. How about shutter times? The one thing which has irritated me for years about phone cameras, and even some low-end dedicated digital cameras, is that there is considerable lag between you pressing the shutter and the photo actually being captured. That’s natural and necessary in very-low-light conditions but at no other time is it really justified. Does the Lumia do better?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.