The joint was jumpin' and the place began to swing…

Another frantically busy day wraps up, although nothing that quite matches yesterday’s 400-words-per-hour effort. Sure, that doesn’t sound that impressive in and of itself — but consider that in the context of being the average number of words I wrote yesterday over a fifteen hour span. I hate work days like that.
Strangely, you won’t see too many of those words very quickly, so I’d better have something else to distract you with. If only, say, the CEO of the biggest telecommunications player in the country was stepping down. That’d at least be the start of a satire story — wouldn’t it? Yes, yes it would, as evidenced by this story at APCMag.com:
Bluescreen: Top Five Sol Replacements: “Hooray! It’s official — Telstra boss Sol Trujillo is quitting. Who will replace him? Bluescreen ponders the top five candidates who won’t get the job.”

About the author

Alex Kidman is a multi-award winning Australian technology writer, former editor at Gizmodo, CNET, GameSpot, ZDNet, PC Mag, APC, Finder and as a contributor to the ABC, SMH, AFR, Courier Mail, GadgetGuy, PC & Tech Authority, Atomic and many more. He's been writing professionally since 1998, and his passions include technology, social issues, education, retro gaming and professional wrestling.

Comments

  1. Four hundred words per hour sounds like automatic writing to me; engage brain – write – stop. As much as I love the language of Shakespeare and love to write, that’s like climbing Mount Everest.
    Robinoz
    PS: I won’t get the Telstra job either; I hate Telstra, it’s one of the worst firms I’ve ever dealt with.

  2. I managed an average of around 1700 per day in November, but bugger all since. Sometimes I wish I had the time to write all day, but I fear I’d run out of things to say rather quickly.
    I doubt I’d get the Telstra job either. They owe me around $15, as they have been telling me once per month for the last year or two (or three, I lose track). Counting postage and the cost of producing the letters I think they’d write me off as a bad risk.

  3. If they owe you $15, why don’t they just send you a cheque or something? Why would you be a bad risk for (essentially) letting them earn interest on your money?
    I’ve done more than my fair share of 1700 word days, but then I guess I do ply my trade as a professional writer — I should be able to do that. 6,000 words is a little different. I think I burnt out some of my writing bits.

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