Snormal Ervice Will Be Resumed As Poon As Sossible

The good news? My head is healing up nicely.
(The crowd goes wild, throwing streamers and confetti in the air. Several young ladies are seen ‘cavorting’ at the front of the audience)
The bad news? These things take time. I can still make myself dizzy at will, simply by tilting my head a particular way. Sure, it’s cheaper than actually going out and getting drunk, but it’s still not a good thing.
As such, I’ll be working to a rather reduced schedule for the next couple of weeks while my brain knits itself back together. And, if I’m lucky, some sort of brain cardigan to keep itself warm during the cold winter months.
Meanwhile, the publishing world grinds ever onwards, and with it, my words of wisdom (or brain injury) reach new audiences. Some of these were published last week, while I was busy recuperating. At CNET.com.au, a guide to iTunes U:
iTunes U: What’s on offer from Australian universities: “Most folk probably lack the self-discipline to technically qualify for a PhD in Latin…”
and a modem-router review with a minimum of Blackadder jokes:
BoB Lite: “BoB’s little brother isn’t a speed demon, but it is simple to connect up and surprisingly powerful for such a cheap router.”
At PC & Tech Authority, a quick news story to cover Microsoft’s giveaway of Kinect-enabled Xbox 360s, for just a moderate (*cough*) cost:
Tech deals: Microsoft giving away free Xbox 360 Kinect bundles to people who buy Windows 7 PC: “Microsoft’s sold a lot of Kinect sensors for the Xbox 360 since introducing the system last November, but there must be at least 5,000 spare sitting around in a warehouse somewhere…”
And at Geekspeak, a couple of columns:
Macbook Air: Is Thin Enough? “The Air comfortably fits into the category of what used to be called “ultraportables” right up until the first netbooks hit the scene and radically reinterpreted not only the size of notebook systems but most markedly their pricing.”
Intel’s New Cores Offer Impressive Performance: “Three years is usually the lifespan of a business machine for depreciation reasons, but even if you’re holding on to older gear, the concept of being able to crunch your numbers more than eight times faster has definite appeal.”
Power Tips: “Despite years of incremental advancements in battery technology, and the promise that fuel cells are “just around the corner” for longer than anybody wants to admit, most systems struggle to get through a full day without wanting to be connected to the mains.”

About the author

Alex Kidman is a multi-award winning Australian technology writer, former editor at Gizmodo, CNET, GameSpot, ZDNet, PC Mag, APC, Finder and as a contributor to the ABC, SMH, AFR, Courier Mail, GadgetGuy, PC & Tech Authority, Atomic and many more. He's been writing professionally since 1998, and his passions include technology, social issues, education, retro gaming and professional wrestling.

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